Autism & Showing Cattle

Autism and Showing Cattle: Through the Eyes of a Big Brother
Around 6 years ago, our family was blessed with my little brother Korbyn. He was born early in the morning at our house. We went on throughout the day and around 8:00 that night I received a call from mom that they had Korbyn and they were taking him to the emergency room because he wasn’t breathing right. He was legally dead at one point after he got to Springfield where he spent the first two weeks of his life in the Intensive Care Unit. Here we are 6 years later after being diagnosed with Autism, Cebral Palsy, eye problems, etc. and he still has a smile on his face. We have been showing registered shorthorns for several years and I worked for Julie Sandstrom when I got the wild idea to get Korbyn a Mini Hereford show heifer. I spent weeks trying to pick the perfect heifer when we settled on Brita. She’s a daughter of a heifer I showed at the American Royal in 2010. The day we picked her up she and Korbyn clicked. She follows him around and she loves for him to scratch her all over. After only 1 full day of being on a halter Korbyn had her washed, blow dried and with a little help was clipping on her. Korbyn has grown to be a great showman, although he sometimes needs help, he gets out there and tries his hardest. Having this show heifer has enabled Korbyn to become more social, gain responsibility, and understand a little more about the cattle industry. For the past 5 years Korbyn has traveled the show circuit with us as myself and my little brothers showed our cattle and he has made some great friends. In fact, all throughout this past spring he has shown his heifer across the state of Arkansas at jackpots and has drawn more attention than the big winners. People come to the show ring just to watch Korbyn show. He got a bigger round of applause than the supreme heifer did at a show in Fayetteville. Korbyn is truly an inspiration for people and is a success story for people of all ages about how showing cattle helps young people grow to become tomorrow’s leaders.
By Braden Hill

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