Category Archives: 2011-4

Region 7 Report

Region 7 Report
National Western Stock Show 2011

The 2011 MHBA Show in Denver was another successful show with 159 cattle entered by 41 exhibitors.
We did have some glitches during move in and weigh and measure, but Justin and I have a meeting with
Mashall Ernst, the new livestock manager to work these problems out.
Thanks to all who made this show a success. We are looking forward to 2012.
Lesta Kugeler

Region 9 Report

Region 9 report

Spring has sprung here on the west coast, at least in the more southern regions. The daffodils have bloomed. The fruit trees are blossoming and there are fields of corn about 3” tall. Which leads me up to my main topic, calving season is under way and it looks like there will be a nice crop of calves for the upcoming Cow Palace show in Oct. It’s always exciting to see how the calves turn out each year.
The Cow Palace planning is under way and I am looking for volunteers to help with the many tasks that need to be done for the show. Anyone who has some great ideas and would like to help out, please contact me.

The Cow Palace this year was the largest show to date in California. We were very pleased by the attendance and representation from California up through the Southwest. Thank you to those that traveled long distances. I believe every ranch represented won at least a class or division award. The prizes seemed very well distributed which is always nice to share in the glory of winning.

One of the highlights of the Cow Palace is the “Parade of Champions”. This parade is during the evening Rodeo where all of the Grand Champions are paraded under the spotlight around the rodeo arena. It is a privilege to participate in.

Ace Cattle Co. made Miniature Hereford history by winning Supreme Champion Bull with DF Prince EB.

Also, the Grand Champion Female DF Aurora Borealis will be donated by Duvall Farms to the John Johnson Scholarship Foundation.

PJ Ranch and Dantre Ranch were awarded with two of the three Cow Palace Herdsman Awards. This award is given for overall stall appearance, educational displays and cleanliness.

Next year promises to be a great show. The Jr. Shows for all breeds will be moved from April to Oct. which will greatly increase our exposure to the youth.

Also, please keep in mind that the youth show has been moved from April to Oct this year and will be held at the same time as the open show. This gives opportunities to the Miniature Hereford Breeders to sell more cattle and to help get the MHBA’s youth organization off the ground here in the west. The youth need 15 cattle entered to have their own show. If there are not that many entries, they will be shown in the AOB (all other breeds) class. I’m sure we can fill the classes. Let’s get it done.

Teresa Speer
Region 9 Director

 

MHBA ANIMAL HEALTH SERIES: Bulls, babes and breeding

By Peggy Joseph-Potter RN, BSN, MHA

Springtime means new beginnings, whether you decide to calve in the winter or spring it is time to start planning for the next calf crop. Developing a timetable and getting cattle bred and rebred on schedule is an important component of herd management. Taking the time to analyze your herd and to choose a bull with traits that accentuate your program can be the difference between success and failure.
Whether you utilize your own bull, AI, or rent one, cattle condition, soundness and health must be considered. Reproductive disease can be carried either by natural or artificial means. Maintenance of a comprehensive vaccination program is essential for a quality-breeding program. Testing for diseases such as Tuberculosis (unless herd has been certified TB-Free), trichomoniasis, BVDV also helps to ensure a healthy outcome.
For those interested in obtaining calves through the AI process, semen is readily available from a number of breeders. It is best to obtain semen from a breeder who is known to meet the generally established health standards in caring for their herd. AI success requires timing, good record keeping and a competent inseminator. Whether you utilize your ranch veterinarian, a reproductive veterinarian or an AI service references and success rates should be a factor in your decision.
In 1970s, Certified Semen Services, Inc., CSS, was formed to qualify and monitor the production of “health certified semen.” Semen obtained through this method must meet very strict standards, including quarantine and the donors must undergo multiple health related tests during their internment. A number of qualified facilities are available throughout the United States; these services perform the required housing, testing, and monitoring of the prospective bulls. Only semen meeting these tough standards is allowed to use the CSS logo. The CSS international qualification can meet the requirements for the export of semen however, each country has its own set of standards; therefore, it is best to involve them early as these organizations have a wealth of knowledge and can walk you through the procedure.

Tuberculosis (TB)
While TB is not a reproductive, disease it can rapidly spread to your herd through the introduction of infected animals or contact with wild or domestic ruminate mammals. The Mycobactium bovis. M bovis, is transmitted by aerosol, ingestion, or breaks in the skin. Like leptospirosis and Brucellosis, humans can develop the disease through contact with a sick animal or ingestion of infected milk. Testing must be performed by a veterinarian and is required for the movement of animals in states not deemed as TB Free.

Trichomoniasis
Infected bulls spread trichomoniasis, a true venereal disease. It can cause abortion in the pregnant cow, usually within the first trimester; however-late term abortions have been known to occur. The best defense against this disease is to utilize a virgin bull or one known to be tested by a veterinarian and deemed disease free. Semen is generally safer than live breeding as the freezing and dilution process reduces the effectiveness of the organism. A vaccine is now available to be use prior to the breeding season.

Bovine Brucellosis-Bangs Disease
Brucellosis, while rare, can have significant implications for livestock due to the threat of abortions; it is noteworthy if the cattle breeder also raises swine, sheep or goats. It was because of this great economic importance and the ability of the disease to cause undulant fever in humans, the United States government stepped in with vigorous elimination programs and now requires RB51 vaccine to be given to all female cattle between the ages of 4-8 months. Breeders who live near wilderness areas where their herds may encounter wild game need to be especially diligent in the protection of their livestock.

Bovine Leptospirosis
Leptospirosis is the most common cause of infectious abortions in cattle. It enters the cow through breaks in the skin and is spread by the urine of sick and carrier animals contaminating feed and water. About 70 percent of infected cows show little outward signs of illness, and they will continue to shed the bacteria in their urine for several months after recovery. Cows can abort even if they do not appear sick. Vaccinating with a product that covers the five most common types of lepto is your best defense against this disease.

Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV)
BVDV is a viral disease that can cause abortion, diseased calves and those with suppressed immune systems. BVD is the most prevalent bovine viral disease. It can be carried by affected animals, on clothing and vehicles. The virus can cause abortion at any stage of gestation, if the fetus survives it may continue to shed the virus as carrier or the state of BVD PI, remaining persistently infected throughout its life. Modified live vaccines are available and should be imperative for any herd health program.

Bluetongue
Buetongue is a disease affecting cattle, goats and sheep. It is seasonal and is most prevalent in the southern and western United States. The disease is caused by a specific midge biting insect, Culiconides varipennis. Infected livestock can develop ulcers and erosion of the lips, tongue and dental pad; abortion of a pregnant animal is not uncommon. Livestock are known to carry it however, sheep are the most susceptible. Vaccine is available for sheep, but not cattle or goats. Bluetongue testing is required by some states for the sale of breeding bulls and for the export of semen. CCS and major sheep producing countries such as Australia require a negative titer.

Have a safe and productive breeding season!

Bibliography
Haynes, N. B. (1978). Keeping Livestock Healthly. North Adams, MA: Storey Publishing, L.L.C.
Thomas, H. S. (1998). Storey’s Guide to Raising Beef Cattle. Storey Publishing.

Biography
Peggy and her husband, Bob Potter, own and operate PJ Ranch LLC in Winton, California where she serves as the Vice President of Animal Health. They have been Miniature Hereford owners and active participants in the MHBA since 2002. She is also employed as a critical care nurse for a local medical center.

Show Biz Down Under

SHOW BIZ DOWN UNDER
We finally made it to the Show ring after a couple of months of refresher and training sessions. Four Miniature Herefords and their young school-aged leaders performed very well against stiff competition from the popular Highland and Dexter cattle along with Red Polls. We came home from two local shows with 1st, 2nd and 3rd placings plus Reserve Champion ribbons accompanied by wide smiles on the kids’ faces. I washed all the cattle the night before but on Show Day the young people put their hearts and souls into grooming their particular animal to perfection. Although I admire the way your animals are presented in the US it is only at the bigger shows in NZ that extensive clipping or shaving is done. For our smaller shows we just trim the hair around the ears, tidy the topknots and level the tails otherwise the animals are in natural (but clean) condition. Maybe if we ever make it to the “big time” we will have to rethink our presentation programme. In the meantime I am working on designing a natty uniform for the kids. The white t-shirts were cool in the hot, humid weather but not very practical.

A spin-off from the showing was that a number of youngsters who were watching approached me later and asked if they could take part next season. The small size of the cattle appealed to them because they can then do what the adults do with the bigger animals. This impresses parents as well so we are helping a new generation into the world of breeding and showing cattle and it doesn’t matter whether they are rural or urban children – this way they have an equal chance to participate. NZ badly needs young people in the agricultural sector but with so many restrictions in place for farm ownership and operation it is becoming a costly business many cannot afford. Agriculture is our country’s main industry yet it lacks the support from the powers that be to continue being a prime producer and we are losing valuable experience handed down the generations through an exodus of bright young people overseas.

Now for a different kind of show. Final preparations are being completed for the Virtual Cattle Show for Miniature Herefords. Closing date for entries has been extended to May 31st, 2011 with judging and results out in June. To obtain all the information for this go to the Australian Miniature Hereford Breeders Network website www.amhbn.com There have been a few changes to the original schedule. The grooming tips were just that – tips. We realise many cattle may not have been halter trained so to approach them with a hose and a brush might have unappreciated repercussions! Most of us over here will be photographing our animals while they are out in their paddocks. It has been suggested perhaps three photos be taken of each animal entered – side-on, front-on and one from the rear – a sample will be on the AMHBN website. Be careful when photographing front-on as the head can appear rather big. It is probably better to have an angle to the photo (see the section on photographing hints). A checklist has also been added so you know whether you have completed the relevant parts for the entry. For any enquiries please contact me on riverlands27@ubernet.co.nz and I will be happy to help you.
Janet Poole,
Riverlets Miniature Herefords,
NEW ZEALAND.

Houston Results

Fall & Winter Junior Heifer Calves

Class 1: 1. Jeff Fulgham with KAP 1/2 Huntress Breeze, 2. Travis & Lauren Turner with TLT Miss Macy, 3. Charlotte & Steve Williams with 05’s B-day Joy, 4. Bill & Dolores Jenkins with LS Queen Anne 055K, 5. Weston Robinson with WR’s Lois Lane, 6. Meredith Roberts with Triple D’s Destiny

Champion Fall & Winter Heifer Calves – KAP 1/2 Huntress Breeze

Reserve Champion Fall & Winter Heifer Calves – TLT Miss Macy

Summer Junior Heifers

Class 4: 1. Bill & Dolores Jenkins with LS Solana 033L, 2. Charles & Ronda Fowler/Dry Hollow Ranch with DHR Faith

Class 5: 1. Juff Fulgham with KAP 1/2 Huntress Kati, 2. Gracie Clark with Sunkist, 3. Schertz Livestock with LLLS Miss Dorla, 4. Dan Kasselder with DNA’s Dixey, 5. Charles & Ronda Fowler/Dry Hollow Ranch with DHR Kate, 6. Charles & Ronda Fowler/Dry Hollow Ranch with DHR Emma

Class 6: 1. Salt Creek Ranch with SC Miss Aster, 2. Salt Creek Ranch with SC Miss Athena, 3. Dan Kasselder with DNA’s Daisey, 4. Salt Creek Ranch with SC Miss Adele, 5. LK Robinson Farms with LK Little Missy

Champion Summer Junior Heifer Calf – KAP 1/2 Huntress Kati

Reserve Champion Summer Junior Heifer Calf – Sunkist

Spring Junior Heifer Calves

Class 9: 1. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s Shiloh, 2. S&K Herefords with SC Miss Annable, 3. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s Laci’s Lil Sis, 4. Steve Splitt with SS Miss Willow, 5. Steve Splitt with SS Miss Lacy, 6. S&K Herefords with SC Miss Arianna

Class 10: 1. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s McKenna, 2. Steve Splitt with Miss Pretty Penney, 3. Montgomery Mini Herefords with HD Decker’s Miss Mabeline 1, 4. Travis & Lauren Turner with TLT Miss Lucey, 5. Jeff Fulghan with KAP’s Viking’s Lil Cupid

Champion Spring Junior Heifer Calf – JW’s Shiloh

Reserve Champion Spring Junior Heifer Calf – SC Miss Annable

Fall & Winter Intermediate Heifers

Class 13: 1. LK Robinson Farms with SF Miss Max Lilly

Class 14: 1. Montgomery Mini Herefords with HD TJ’s Alley Surprise, 2. Meredith Roberts with KBH Little Juliet

Champion Fall & Winter Intermediate Heifer – HC TJ’s Alley Surprise

Reserve Champion Fall & Winter Intermediate Heifer – KBH Little Juliet

Summer Intermediate Heifers

Class 17: 1. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s Miss Tyler, 2. Aubree Blissard with LS Sir Tristan’s Lady 9775, 3. Aubree Blissard with LS Sir Tristan’s Lady 973L, 4. Cheraye Aguirre with DLT SF Aubrey, 5. Aubree Blissard with LS Miss Sierra Oak

Class 18: 1. Jeff Bash with Miss Kitty, 2. Mason Leifeste with TLT Miss Molly, 3. Leah Stroud with WW Golden June, 4. Andrew Aguirre with LS Miss Oak Ridge

Champion Summer Intermediate Heifer – JW’s Miss Tyler

Reserve Champion Summer Intermediate Heifer – Miss Kitty

Spring Intermediate Heifers

Class 21: Jeff Fulgham with SF Max Golden Girl, 2. Jeff Fulgham with SC Miss Maybell, 3. 4 Wall Farms with SF Miss Chey Girl, 4. 4 Wall Farms with SF Miss Willy Girl

Champion Spring Intermediate Heifer – SF Mac Golden Girl

Reserve Champion Spring intermediate Heifer – SC Miss Maybell

Grand Champion Heifer – KAP 1/2 Huntress Breeze

Reserve Grand Champion Heifer – KAP 1/2 Huntress Kati

Cow/Calf

Class 26: 1. Weston Robinson with LS Miss Pebble O’Gold 87U2, 2. Greg Schulz with SS Miss Mercedes

Champion Cow/Calf – LS Miss Pebble O’Gold 87U2

Reserve Champion Cow?Calf – SS Miss Mercedes

Pair of Females

Class 29: 1. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s Shiloh, 2. Salt Creek Ranch with SC Miss Aster

Champion Pair of Females – JW’s Shiloh

Reserve Champion Pair of Females – SC Miss Aster

Fall & Winter Junior Bull Calves

Class 32: 1. Greg Schulz with SF Mr. Maximillian Lex, 2. Meredith Roberts with JAM Duke of Guns, 3. 4 Wall Farms with JAM Napoleon

Champion Fall & Winter Junior Bull Calf – SF Mr. Maximillian Lex

Reserve Champion Fall & Winter Junior Bull Calf – JAM Duke of Guns

Summer Junior Bull Calves

Class 35: 1. Charlotte & Steve Williams with WW Tom Thumb, 2. Travis & Lauren Turner with TLT Ted, 3. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s All In

Class 36: 1. LK Robinson Farms with LK Spencer, 2. Bergheim Mini Herefords with BMH Prince Ferdinand, 3. Jeff Fulgham with KAP inch of Fletcher, 4. LK Robinson Farms with LK Sexi’s Sox, 5. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s Rocket, 6. Charles & Ronda Fowler/Dry Hollow Ranch with DHR Jack

Champion Summer Junior Bull Calf – WW Tom Thumb

Reserve Champion Summer Junior Bull Calf – LK Spencer

Spring Junior Bull Calves

Class 39: 1. Steve Splitt with SS Mr. Seth, 2. Cole Cattle with CCC Lance’s Five-0

Class 40: 1. Montgomery Mini Herefords with HD Sir Dexter

Champion Spring Junior Bull Calf – SS Mr. Seth

Reserve Champion Spring Junior Bull Calf – HD Sir Dexter

Fall & Winter Intermedite Bulls

Class 43: 1. Greg Schulz with SS Mr. Kirk

Champion Fall & Winter Intermediate Bull – SS Mr. Kirk

Summer Intermediate Bulls

Class 47: 1. Meredith Roberts with JAM Husky Lil Devil, 2. Jeff Fulgham with LS Pine Mountain 945K

Champion Summer Intermediate Bull – JAM Husky Lil Devil

Reserve Champion Summer Intermediate Bull – LS Pine Mountain 945K

Spring Intermediate Bulls

Class 50: 1. JBarW Cattle Co. with JW’s Bad Company

Champion Spring Intermediate Bull – JW’s Bad Company

2-year-old Bulls

Class 53: 1. Charlotte & Steve Williams with WW Sam’s Gold E, 2. Cole Cattle Co. with CCC Texas Ranger D02U

Champion 2-year-old Bull – WW Sam’s Gold E

Reserve Champion 2-year-old Bull – CCC Texas Ranger D02U

Grand Champion Bull – SS Mr. Seth

Reserve Grand Champion Bull – JW’s Bad Company

Pair of Bulls

1. Steve Splitt, 2. LK Robinson Farms, 3. Cole Cattle Co.

Premier Exhibitor

Steve Splitt

 

Austin Results

Star of Texas Fair and Rodeo – Austin, Texas

Fall & Winter Junior Heifer Calves

Class 1: 1. Jeff Fulgham with KAP 1/2 Huntress Breeze, 2. LK Robinson Farms with WR’s Lois Lane, 3. Bill & Dolores Jenkins with LS Queen Anne 055K, 4. Travis & Lauren Turner with TLT Miss Macy, 5. Charlotte & Steve Williams with 05’s B-day Joy, 6. Meredith Roberts with Triple D’s Destiny

Champion Fall & Winter Junior Heifer Calf – KAP 1/2 Huntress

Reserve Champion Fall & Winter Junior Heifer Calf – WR’s Lois Lane

Summer Junior Heifer

Class 2: 1. Bill & Dolores Jenkins with LS Solana 033L, 2. Charles & Ronda Fowler with DHR Pattie, 3. Charles & Ronda Fowler with DHR Faith, 4. Jack King with JK’s Miss Lou C1

Class 3: 1. Landen Schertz with LLLS Miss Doria, 2. Jeff Fulgham with KAP 1/2 Huntress Kati, 3. Charles & Ronda Fowler with DHR Kate, 4. Charles & Ronda Fowler with DHR Emma

Class 4: 1. Lesta Kugeler with SC Miss Aster, 2. Lester Kugeler with SC Miss Adele, 3. LK Robinson Farms with LK Little Missy

Champion Summer Junior Heifer Calf – SC Miss Aster

Reserve Champion Summer Junior Heifer Calf – LLLS Miss Doria

Spring Junior Heifer Calves

Class 5: 1. Justin Grady with JW’s Laci’s Lil Sis, 2. Shelby Ehart with SC Miss Arianna, 3. Shelby Ehart with SC Miss Anneable, 4. Steve Splitt with SS Miss Willow, 5. Steve Splitt with SS Miss Brenda, 6. Steve Splitt with SS Miss Lacie, 7. Charles & Ronda Fowler with SS Miss Asia

Class 6: 1. Justin Grady with JW’s McKenna, 2. Steve Splitt, 3. Jeff Fulgham with KAP Viking’s Lil Cupid, 4. Travis & Lauren Turner with TLT Missy Lucey, 5. Greg Schulz with HD Decker’s Miss

Champion Spring Junior Heifer Calf – JW’s Laci’s Lil Sis

Reserve Champion Spring Junior Heifer Calf – JW’s McKenna

Fall & Winter Intermediate Heifer

Class 7: 1. Hilliary Dumas with HD TJ’s Alley Surprise, 2. Meredith Roberts with KBH Little Juliet

Class 8: 1. Jack King with JK’s Miss, 2. LK Robinson Farms with SF Miss Max Lilly

Champion Fall & Winter Intermediate Heifer – JK’s Miss

Reserve Champion Fall & Winter Intermediate Heifer – Miss Max Lilly

Summer Intermediate Heifer

Class 9: 1. Jeff Bash with SS Miss Kitty, 2. Mason Leifeste with TLT Miss Molly, 3. Andrew Aguirre with LS Miss Oak Ridge 9025, 4. Leah Stroud with WW Golden June

Class 10: 1. Justin Grady with JW’s Miss Tyler, 2. Cheraye Aguirre with DLT SF Aubrey, 3. Aubree Blissard with LS Sir Tristan’s Lady, 4. Aubrey Blissard with LS Miss Sierra Oak 9V64, 5. Aubrey Blissard with LS Sir Tristan’s Lady

Champion Summer Intermediate Heifer – JW’s Miss Tyler

Reserve Champion Summer Intermediate Heifer – SS Miss Kitty

Spring Intermediate Heifer

Class 11: 1. Jeff Fulgham with SF Max Golden Girl, 2. Jeff Fulgham with SC Miss Maybell

Champion Spring Intermediate Heifer – SF Max Golden Girl

Reserve Champion Spring Intermediate Heifer – SC Miss Maybell

Grand Champion Female – JW’s Miss Tyler

Reserve Grand Champion Female – SS Miss Kitty

Cow/Calf

Class 12: 1. LK Robinson Farms with LS Miss Pebble O’Gold, 2. Greg Schulz with SS Miss Mercedes

Pair of Females

Class 13: 1. Justin Grady, 2. Lesta Kugeler, 3. Steve Splitt, 4. Charles & Ronda Fowler

Fall & Winter Junior Bull Calves

Class 14: 1. Meredith Roberts with JAM Duke of Guns, 2. Greg Schulz with SS Mr. Maximillian Lex

Champion Fall & Winter Junior Bull Calf – JAM Duke of Guns

Reserve Champion Fall & Winter Junior Bull Calf – SS Mr. Maximillian Lex

Summer Junior Bull Calf

Class 15: 1. Justin Grady with JW’s All In, 2. Charlotte & Steve Williams with WW Tom Thumb

Class 16: 1. Charles & Ronda Fowler with DHR Jack, 2. Richard McLean with BMH Prince Ferdinand, 3. Justin Grady with JW’s Rocket, 4. Jeff Fulgham with KAP Inch of Fletcher, 5. LK Robinson Farms with LK Spencer, 6. Justin Grady with JW’s A Top Gun, 7. LK Robinson Farms with LK’s Sexi’s Sox

Champion Summer Junior Bull Calf – DHR Jack

Reserve Champion Summer Junior Bull Calf – JW’s All In

Spring Junior Bull

Class 17: 1. Steve Splitt, 2. Jack King with JK’s King Arthur

Class 18: 1. Greg Schulz with HD Sir Dexter

Champion Spring Junior Bull – Splitt Creek

Reserve Spring Junior Bull – HD Sir Dexter

Fall & Winter Intermediate Bull

Class 20: 1. Greg Schulz with SS Mr. Kirk

Champion Fall & Winter Bull – SS Mr. Kirk

Summer Intermediate Bull

Class 21: 1. Jack King with JK’s High Jumper, 2. Meredith Roberts with JAM Husky Lil Devil, 3. Jeff Fulgham with LS Pine Mountain 945K

Champion Summer Intermediate Bull – JK’s High Jumper

Reserve Champion Summer Intermediate Bull – JAM Husky Lil Devil

Spring Intermediate Bull

Class 22: 1. Justin Grady with JW’s Bad Company

Champion Spring Intermediate Bull – JW’s Bad Company

2-Year-Old Bull

Class 23: 1. Charlotte & Steve Williams with WW Sam’s Gold E

Champion 2-Year-Old Bull – WW Sam’s Gold E

Grand Champion Bull – WW Sam’s Gold E

Reserve Grand Champion Bull – SS Mr Kirk

Pair of Bulls

Class 24: 1. LK Robinson Farms, 2. Justin Grady

Prospect Steers

Class 25: 1. Charlotte & Steve Williams with WW Rambunctious Sam, 2. Aubree Blissard with Salty, 3. Charlotte & Steve Williams with WW Joseph’s Dusk, 4. Lydia Schertz with SS Mr Dempster

Class 26: 1. Landen Schertz with SS Mr Leroy

Champion Prospect Steer – SS Mr Leroy

Reserve Champion Prospect Steer – WW Rambunctious Sam

Market Steers

Class 27: 1. Landen Schertz with KAP Leander Viking, 2. Landen Schertz with SS Sir Simmon

Class 28: 1. Kirstie Kasch with WW Evening Rockstar, 2. Meredith Mikeska with Melvin, 3. Liberty Cooper with KAP Karl Viking

Champion Market Steer – WW Evening Rockstar

Reserve Champion Market Steer – Melvin

 

 

 

Region 8 Report

MHBA Region 8
Directors Report

To all the members of Region 8, I want to say thank you for allowing me to represent you on the Miniature Hereford Breeders Association board. As I stated in prior communication with Region 8 members I will not be seeking re-election of the Regional Director position.

I encourage everyone to support their Regional Directors, as we are elected to help represent you to the MHBA board and without your input we are not able to complete this task as efficiently as expected.

The new director will be working on the continuation of the MHBA youth program that has not come to a conclusion as yet. Do not confuse this with the Miniature Hereford Youth Foundation, which is an educational/scholarship program. My suggestion for the youth program was to put an application process to the membership, and select the qualified applicants for the Youth adult board from the application pool. At the time of this letter, there has not been a process for choosing adult board members for the new Youth Program put into place that I am aware of. I do again encourage you to contact your director with any ideas or concerns that you might have.

So to the new MHBA Regional Director for Region 8, I wish you the best and you will have my continuing support as a member of the MHBA. If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,
Arlou Cox
MHBA Regional Director
Region 8

 

 

Where to Show Up

Where to Show Up
Charlotte Williams 3/5/2011

Where can I show my Miniature Hereford? I am often asked this question, but the answer is as varied as the animals and the people who show them. However, there are some options you can consider in your search for the ultimate show year with a trip every week!

The most obvious answer is the Miniature Hereford Breeders Association sanctioned and sponsored shows. Currently there are eleven scattered throughout the year and across the United States: Denver (January), San Antonio (February), Houston (March), Austin (March), Des Moines (August), Oregon (September), Amarillo (September), Dallas (October), Billings (October), Kansas City (October), and Louisville (November). As information for each of these shows becomes available it is posted on our website at www.mhbaonline.org or you can also talk to your Regional Director or other member of the MHBA Board.

But there are other show options, too. Remember, your mini is a Registered Hereford, so any show that allows Herefords should allow your animal to show. Sometimes, you just need to show up! For example, there was not a class specifically for Miniatures at the Tri-State Fair in Amarillo, so a couple of us got together for moral support and took on the big guys. We didn’t end up at the top of our classes, but we had a lot of fun, the kids had some extra experience in the show ring, and this last year they included a show specifically for us that promises to go and grow into the future. By demonstrating there was interest in the area, and speaking respectfully but persistently with show organizers, we have opened a new opportunity.

Aside from the national American Hereford Association, many states also have branches that are active in showing and promoting the breed. They can be another great resource for expanding your show horizons. In fact, last year the Texas Junior Hereford Association contacted us to tell us that they would have classes for Miniature Herefords at their annual state show. We had been talking to their representatives at other places, and they decided it was time to welcome us in. Again, for a small membership fee, the kids had a good time, and we all made some new friends that we will see again.

Young people have more options when it comes to showing cattle. There are excellent organizations such as the 4-H and Future Farmers of America (FFA) that are often administered by your local school district and the county extension office, and have opportunities at the local, state, and even national levels. Talk to these folks! You can become involved as a volunteer or participant and encourage inclusion of the minis. Even if there is not a class specifically for minis, join in. Often they can show against the standard animals, until you can demonstrate enough interest to justify a mini class. But be aware that many shows have weight limits for steers – for example, there is a 900 pound minimum in our county show – so be prepared to deal with an animal that may not “make weight”. Knowing your animal’s genetic background from the breeder can be critical, but even the best predictions may fail. Again, doing your homework ahead of time can make or break a situation.

These organizations can open doors to a variety of shows, from the county fair to jackpots to informal get-togethers. Often jackpots are particularly welcoming to new animals. The whole point is to draw in as many entries as possible, so the show is bigger and better. And you can always throw your own show for the local kids in your back pasture. Communication with youth organizations – both ways – keeps these programs alive and well.

Perhaps driving cattle around the country is not an option for you. How about a Virtual Cattle Show? Yes, now you can “show” your cattle over the internet! Our friends in Australia had the great idea to use technology to expand our Miniature Hereford show horizons to a global extent. They have invited us to participate in their electronic show in June, and it promises to be a winner. For more information on this exciting new event, go to “Events” on the website and check it out.

Respect and persistence are the keys to success. Wherever you go, talk to anyone who will listen. Promote your breed in a variety of venues, and help get out the word that the minis are coming! You never know who may be the pivotal person that hears your message and wants to help. Ask, and you may receive! When talking to a specific venue, be sure to do your homework and find the right people, but remember that they have been doing this work for a while – often decades – and may not be eager to change a program they have established with a lot of sweat and tears. Know what rules are already in place and how your animals can fit into the schedule. Be prepared to make positive suggestions and to pick up some of the extra work that will be required to make the show a success. Also contact your Regional Director to keep them informed and to gain access to guidelines and other assistance from the MHBA Show Committee.

But can you win? You bet! Kirstie Kasch showed her steer, Rocky, at county last month and won the light-weight British class. The next weekend she ran him over to a nearby town that holds an FFA/4-H show covering about twenty surrounding counties. They are eager to grow their show, so last year they added a Miniature class, and Kirstie and Rocky won! Leah Stroud showed her heifer, June, at county and took Grand Champion! Their hard work all year long paid off. Again, knowing your genetics is important, but even with a lesser quality animal, a person can learn a lot from spending a year feeding, grooming, generally caring for another living creature and finally showing off the results.

Show on!